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10 KU students receive Undergraduate Research Awards for summer

Thursday, June 18, 2020

LAWRENCE — This summer, 10 KU students will receive Undergraduate Research Awards (UGRAs). UGRA recipients are awarded a $1,000 scholarship as they work on mentored research and creative projects.

“The students who applied for summer Undergraduate Research Awards turned in their proposals amidst the rapid transition to online classes in the spring,” said Alison Olcott, director of the Center for Undergraduate Research and associate professor of geology.  “I am so impressed with our students’ ability to adapt their plans and move forward with the important questions they are posing in their research.”

Students apply for UGRAs by writing a four-page research proposal under the guidance of a mentor. Faculty reviewers evaluate the applications based on the merit of the applicant's proposal, the applicant's academic record and a recommendation from the mentor.

The Center for Undergraduate Research will begin taking applications for the Spring 2021 UGRA competition during the fall semester.  More information can be found here: https://ugresearch.ku.edu/student/fund/research-awards  

Students receiving awards for summer 2020 are listed below in alphabetical order along with academic level, hometown, project title, mentor and mentor’s department:

Jasmin Albert, a senior from Overland Park: “Influence of tail-associated environmental fluctuations on species coexistence and biodiversity via the storage effect,” mentored by Daniel Reuman, professor of ecology & evolutionary biology and senior scientist at the Kansas Biological Survey.

Zoe Su-Huey Chan, a junior from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: “Do non-native plants benefit from native soil biota during environmental stresses?” mentored by Benjamin Sikes, associate professor of ecology & evolutionary biology and associate scientist at the Kansas Biological Survey.

Emma Cosner, a junior from Lawrence: “Examining the influence of Xantphos, a donor-acceptor phosphine ligand, on H2 evolution by organometallic rhodium complexes,” mentored by James Blakemore, assistant professor of chemistry.

Emily Doffing, a senior from Wichita: “Trends in adolescents’ responses to passive and active suicidal ideation,” mentored by Barbara Kerr, Williamson Family Distinguished Professor of Counseling Psychology.

Zai Erb, a sophomore from Lawrence: “Examining geographical spatial synchrony with respect to topography,” mentored by Daniel Reuman, professor of ecology & evolutionary biology and senior scientist at the Kansas Biological Survey.

Cheyenne Loo, a senior from Olathe: “Hijacking the enemy comms: eavesdropping and quorum sensing in bacterial competition,” mentored by Josephine Chandler, associate professor of molecular biosciences.

Rachel Manweiler, a junior from Lawrence: “Quantifying the differences in Apyrene and Eupyrene sperm in two lineages of Plodia Interpunctella,” mentored by James Walters, associate professor of ecology & evolutionary biology.

Tristan Myers, a senior from Topeka: “Paramagnetic species as a factor in TD-NMR analysis of polymer suspension systems,” mentored by Alan Allgeier, associate professor of chemical & petroleum engineering.

James Ross, a senior from Overland Park: “PFASs compounds as in vivo selective pressures: The use of direct selection to induce a bioremediate adaptation in pure cultures of bacterium Azospira oryzae,” mentored by Justin Hutchison, assistant professor of civil, environmental & architectural engineering.

Trong Minh Vu, a sophomore from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: “Application of Phage-Proteins to Remove Pathogenic Bacteria in Drinking Water Treatment,” mentored by Justin Hutchison, assistant professor of civil, environmental & architectural engineering.


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