Preparing Educators as Leaders

Emergency Substitute license

In Kansas, substitute teachers must have either their Kansas teaching license or an "Emergency Substitute" license, which requires at least 60 hours or college credit. Emergency subs can teach up to 50% time with no benefits, and pay is usually around $85-100 day. However, fewer districts are using Emergency Subs now, since they have unemployed licensed teachers willing to sub.

The best time to apply is July through October; by November, most districts have all the emergency subs they will need for the rest of the year. To apply for the Emergency Sub license:

  1. Download the form 8a application that says "Initial Emergency Substitute Application" at www.ksde.org. Licensure. Applications.
  2. Mail it to KSDE with official hardcopy transcripts and the fee. (Order KU transcripts from the KU Registrar's Office.)
  3. Get a special fingerprint card for the background clearance. You can order one on the KSDE website OR you can come get one in the Welcome Center at room 208 JRP, M-F 8-11:30am and 1-5pm. Follow the directions with the card. Also, put a separate check in the envelope for processing, which takes about 4 weeks.
  4. We recommend taking the fingerprint packet to KUPD, 15th and Crestline, if you live in Lawrence. They, like most police stations, will charge $5-10 for their assistance.
  5. The licensure process at KSDE usually takes 4-8 weeks to complete. While waiting to receive the license, you should start applying to individual school districts to work as an emergency substitute teacher. Districts have online applications and most will require interviews and a few hours of training before you start work.

Contact

Alisa Branham
Licensure Officer
#211 JRP Hall
785-864-9602
785-864-5076
abranham@ku.edu

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